SOUL OF A NATION: ART IN THE AGE OF BLACK POWER

NEWSText: Editor

Barkley L. Hendricks, Icon for my Man Superman (Superman Never Saved Any Black People-Bobby Seale), 1969. Jack Shainman Gallery. © Barkley L. Hendricks. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Barkley L. Hendricks, Icon for my Man Superman (Superman Never Saved Any Black People-Bobby Seale), 1969. Jack Shainman Gallery. © Barkley L. Hendricks. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Featuring more than 150 works by over 60 artists – many on display in the UK for the first time – “Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power” at Tate Modern, London offers a timely opportunity to see how American cultural identity was re-shaped during a period of social unrest and political struggle.

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From 1963 to 1983, when iconic figures like Aretha Franklin, Muhammad Ali and Toni Morrison were making race and identity major issues in American music, sport and literature, what did it mean to be a Black artist in the USA? During the Civil Rights movement and at the birth of Black Power, what was art’s purpose and who was its audience?

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power explores how such issues played out among and beyond African American artists through an stunning selection of vibrant paintings, photographs, prints and sculptures.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power
Date: 12th July – 22nd October, 2017
Opening hours: 10:00 – 18:00 (Friday, Saturday until 22:00)
Place: Tate Modern
Address: Bankside, London SE1 9TG
Tel: +44 (0)20 7887 8888
http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/

Text: Editor

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